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Research Article: A simulated “Night-onCall” to assess and address the readiness-for-internship of transitioning medical students

Research Article: A simulated “Night-onCall” to assess and address the readiness-for-internship of transitioning medical students
Lead Author: Adina Kalet
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

“Medical students transitioning from undergraduate medical education (UME) to graduate medical education, experience uncertainty and distress about their readiness-for-internship. This lack of readiness may be partially responsible for the “July effect”—a reported increase of 10% in fatal medical errors in teaching hospitals in North America when these new graduates enter the workforce each July.”This article lays out the details of a simulated “Night-on-Call” (NOC) for incoming interns and residents providing them with “an authentic educational experience” to help ease any anxiety about their new appointments.Read the full article in Advances in Simulation here.

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Research Article: Assessing the Believability of Standardized Patients Trained to Portray Communication Disorders

Research Article: Assessing the Believability of Standardized Patients Trained to Portray Communication Disorders
Lead Author: Carolyn Baylor
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern UniversityFeinberg School of Medicine

The use of Standardized Patients in various healthcare fields is growing. The authors of this study set out to show that SPs are believable and, therefore, useful in teaching speech-language pathologists. While there is much research that has focused on standardized patient use in other areas of healthcare education, speech pathology has not yet made many contributions to the body of research on simulated experiences. This study offers a look into the authenticity of SP portrayals of communication disorders.Read the full article in the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology here.

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Podcasts: KeyLIME and Pomegranate Health Offer Podcasts in Medicine

Podcasts: KeyLIME and Pomegranate Health Offer Podcasts in Medicine
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

If you have ever wished you had more time to read medical education articles or other resources but just can’t seem to find the time in your schedule, consider multitasking and listening to a podcast while you work. Two resources, Key Literature in Medical Education (KeyLIME) and Pomegranate Health offer podcasts that discuss the main points of a medical education article in just 20 minutes, or present stories about clinical decision-making, physician well-being or socio-ethical challenges in medicine, respectively. You can listen to podcasts directly from the website or you can subscribe on iTunes or other podcast streaming apps. Listen in for something different or a change of pace!

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Essay: A Standardized Patient’s Medical Journey – When Art Imitates Life

Essay: A Standardized Patient’s Medical Journey – When Art Imitates Life
By: Stephen Fairchild, Standardized Patient and Actual Patient, UNC Chapel Hill School of Medicine

Stephen Fairchild, a standardized patient at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill School of Medicine, recently submitted an essay to the ASPE eNews Blog recounting his experience working as an SP, and how that experience resulted in him being a better actual patient as well as a better advocate for his own health.Thank you, Stephen, for sharing your experience.

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Media Article: Rehearsing Transgender Healthcare

Media Article: Rehearsing Transgender Healthcare
By: Alex Stern
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

Bianca Leigh is playing a character named Tia Lopez.“Tia Lopez is a 36-year-old woman of trans experience. She works as a bartender. She’s in a two-year relationship with her boyfriend, and she has come for her annual physical,” Leigh explains.Leigh is a standardized patient — an actor, pretending to be sick or coming in for a fake checkup, so medical students can practice being doctors in a low-risk environment. She is one of several “patients” that students at New York University School of Medicine will practice with today. Read the full article on Newsworks.org here.

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Media Article: 5 Principles for the Teacher of Adults

Media Article: 5 Principles for the Teacher of Adults
By: Deb Peterson
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The teacher of adults has a different job from the one who teaches children. If you're teaching adult students, for the best results it's important to understand and practice five principles espoused by Malcolm Knowles, a pioneer in the study of adult learning. He observed that adults learn best when:

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Media Article: Pretend Patients Getting Paid to Play Sick

Media Article: Pretend Patients Getting Paid to Play Sick
By: Austin O’Connor
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

Pretending to be sick isn't just for high school students who haven't studied for exams or the office worker trying to sneak in a sunny afternoon at the ballpark. In fact, faking illness can be a nice little side gig — if you have the desire and skills to act out an ailment and be examined by medical students in training.Read the full article on the AARP website here.

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Podcast: ASPE Standards of Best Practice

Podcast: ASPE Standards of Best Practice
By: Karen Lewis and Carrie Bohnert
Advances in Simulation invited authors Karen Lewis and Carrie Bohnert to participate in a podcast about the ASPE Standards of Best Practice. ASPE members can listen to the podcast here.

Publications Committee Mission:“To bring high quality reporting of current research, trends, techniques and information regarding SP methodology and other relevant industry articles to the attention of the membership through the web-based ASPE eNews blog.”

Medical Education: “There’s a Person in There”

Medical Education: “There’s a Person in There”
By: Joe Burns
Submitted by: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The elderly female patient was a frequent visitor of the dermatology clinic.  Her physician had provided routine care for her, removing suspicious spots for decades.  Today she was presenting for an exacerbation of her psoriasis.  We entered the room and the patient was visibly distraught.  She was wearing a wrinkled t-shirt and old jeans, a stark contrast to her usual Southern Lilly Pulitzer dresses.  As we began taking her history, she broke down, bawling over her psoriasis. Read the full articleat Reflective MedEdhere.

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Podcast: How Standardized Patients Work

Podcast: How Standardized Patients Work
By: Josh Clark and Chuck Bryant, Stuff You Should Know
Submitted by: Anna Lank, C3NY

Even the most brilliant medical minds need a good bedside manner, and thanks to standardized patients, they can improve their skills. What are they? Part-time workers who pretend to be real patients so doctors can practice on live humans. If you're remembering Kramer on Seinfeld right about now, you're not alone.Listen to the podcast here.

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General Interest: Med Students Create App to Connect LGBTQ Patient, Inclusive Doctors

General Interest: Med Students Create App to Connect LGBTQ Patient, Inclusive Doctors
By: Rebecca Oh
Submitted by: Stephen Charles, Educational Resources Committee Chair

Three medical students at the University of Pennsylvania are getting ready launch their LGBTQ-focused health care app, SpectrumScores, by the end of August.The app will connect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer patients with doctors who have been recognized as LGBTQ-friendly by advocacy organizations, academic medical centers and, eventually, the app users themselves.Read the full article on the NBC News website here.

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Editorial: Standardized Patients: It’s All in the Works

Editorial: Standardized Patients: It’s All in the Works
By: Nancy McNaughton & Mindi Anderson
Submitted by: Betty Grandis

A special edition of Clinical Simulation in Nursing dealing almost exclusively with standardized patients was published in July of this year, with an editorial and introduction by Nancy McNaughton, MEd, PhD, and Mindi Anderson, PhD, ARNP, CPNP-PC, CNE, CHSE-A, ANEF. Read the editorial and introduction here, or link to open access articles from the journal here (links may be slow).

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Research Article: Simulation Training to Improve 9-1-1 Dispatcher Identification of Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Research Article: Simulation Training to Improve 9-1-1 Dispatcher Identification of Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Lead author: Hendrika Meischke
Submitted by: Jennie Struijk, University of Washington

This study used standardized patients to improve 911 dispatcher response reactions to emergency calls. SPs from the program at the University of Washington participated in the study by dialing in during training sessions and reporting a variety of complaints to emergency medical dispatcher trainees. The article showcases some scholarly work in an area of simulation that does not always receive a lot of attention. Read the full article in Resuscitation here.

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Media Article: Northwestern Medicine Caregivers Practice Having Difficult Conversations

Media Article: Northwestern Medicine Caregivers Practice Having Difficult Conversations
By: Will Doss
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

Frontline caregivers practiced breaking bad news to simulated patients at an innovative new multi-site seminar broadcast from Feinberg’s Simulation Lab earlier this month. The seminar uses active learning techniques to provide far more skill development than a simple lecture, according to course organizers. Read the full article at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine News Center here.

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Research Article: Assessing the Performance and Satisfaction of Medical Residents Utilizing Standardized Patient Versus Mannequin-simulated Training

Research Article: Assessing the Performance and Satisfaction of Medical Residents Utilizing Standardized Patient Versus Mannequin-simulated Training
Lead Author: Ali A. Alsaad
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

From the article: “At our institution, the traditional IM curriculum in clinical reasoning and critical thinking skills focused on the learner interacting with a simulation mannequin. Feedback from this experience was mixed, with the learners often pointing out that the interaction with the mannequin was unrealistic. We hypothesized that using an SP instead of a mannequin would not only give a more realistic experience but would also improve medical knowledge acquisition. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare residents’ performance in management of four scenarios depicting patient clinical deterioration utilizing either a high-fidelity simulation mannequin or SP.” Read the results of this study in Advances in Medical Education and Practice here.

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Media Article: Disaster exercise helps Texas A&M medical students develop skills for mass casualty scenarios

Media Article: Disaster exercise helps Texas A&M medical students develop skills for mass casualty scenarios
By: Kelan Lyons
Submitted by: Todd Lash

Lexie Valadez wasn't pregnant, but she gave birth to a beautiful baby doll on Thursday morning."I was a laboring mother today. I had a baby," said the Texas A&M University College of Nursing senior. Valadez was playing a role in A&M's ninth annual Disaster Day, a mass casualty disaster training exercise that aims to teach students vital skills needed to respond to emergency situations. Read the full article in The Eagle here.

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Healthcare in Simulation Week 2017

Healthcare in Simulation Week 2017
By: Bob Bolyard, ASPE Member Liaison

Thanks to the Society for Simulation in Health Care (SSH), the week of September 11-15 will be celebrated as Healthcare Simulation Week. And ASPE has been invited to the party!

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Karen Lewis receives Outstanding Educator of the Year Award

Karen Lewis receives Outstanding Educator of the Year Award
By: Grace Gephardt, ASPE President

The Outstanding Educator of the Year Award is awarded to a member that has been involved in human simulation education for more than seven years, has made significant contributions to the community, and is recognized as a leader within their own institution, the community, and in national and international organizations. Each year, nominations are sought and reviewed by an ad hoc committee of former recipients who carefully consider all nominees before arriving on a final decision. This year’s Outstanding Educator of the Year Award was presented to Dr. Karen Lewis during the ASPE Conference in Alexandria.

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Immersive Training Experience Helps Teach Safe Opioid Prescribing

Immersive Training Experience Helps Teach Safe Opioid Prescribing
By: David C. Holzman
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer

Simulation and immersive learning techniques appear to be particularly effective and powerful for teaching safe opioid prescribing, according to a new study. The research involved pain medicine fellows and anesthesiology residents at Stanford University—all trainees at the graduate level—working in a simulated outpatient pain clinic. There, a standardized patient actor played the role of a patient who meets the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) for an opioid use disorder, and is asking for an opioid refill to prevent withdrawal, having presented to the clinician with only one tablet of hydromorphone left. Read the full Pain Medicine News article here.

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In the Age of Digital Medicine, the Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On

In the Age of Digital Medicine, the Humble Reflex Hammer Hangs On
By: Bret Stetka
Submitted by: Bob Bolyard

Receiving a diagnosis in 2017 — at least one made at a medical center outfitted with the latest clinical gadgetry — might include a scan that divides your body into a bread loaf of high-resolution digital slices. Your DNA might be fed through a gene sequencer that spits out your mortal code in a matter of hours. Even your smartphone might soon be used to uncover health problems.Yet nearly 130 years since its inception — after decades of science has mapped out our neuronal pathways — a simple knob of rubber with a metal handle remains one of medicine's most essential tools. I'm referring to the cheap, portable, easy-to-use reflex hammer. Read the full NPR article here.

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