BLOG

In The Spotlight: University of Louisville School of Medicine

Submitted By: Carrie A. Bohnert

Center Location: Louisville, KY

Read More

My Covid-19 Story from the SP Point of View

By: Johnnie Anderson
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME

Q: How has your experience as an SP changed since the pandemic? I miss seeing, sharing ideas and just talking with fellow SPs and working face-to-face with the SP educators, medical students and professionals.
Q: Have you had to look for other work? If so, what are you doing? I’m so grateful for what’s happening now.  Prior to the pandemic, I was teaching dance fitness in addition to SP work. At the inception of the Stay-at-Home orders and social distancing requirements, I put the creative juices to work after determining what brings me pleasure and fulfillment. Facilitating dance fitness was near the top of the list. Although, I was teaching in-person prior to and at the time the pandemic hit, I researched and decided to offer online classes. I’m so grateful for facilitating 3 classes a week plus occasional customized group classes via Zoom! Participation has been great. There’s a fee for each class, but I also offer “or pay what you can if you can” option. I want anyone who’d like to engage in a dynamic fitness program that’s truly good for the mind, body and spirit to join in.

Read More
1 Comments

How the COVID-19 Pandemic is Challenging Medical Education to Be Better

By: Prateek Sharma
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

With the recent outbreak of COVID-19, we’ve seen a drastic shift towards a desire to implement telemedicine across clinical practices. However, with growing case rates of COVID-19 among health care workers on the frontline, it seems too late.

Read More

Twelve Tips for the Introduction of Emotional Intelligence in Medical Education

By: C. Roth, K. Eldin, V. Padmanabhan, E. Friedman
Submitted by Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

Medical Teacher has articles entitled “Twelve …” that I always find useful. This particular one provides twelve easy steps to help develop and introduce emotional intelligence into our curriculum. Developing emotional intelligence is vital to enhance patient centered care, clinical outcomes, patient safety, as well as team building.

Read More

Impact of Standardized Patients on First Semester Nursing Students Self-Confidence, Satisfaction, and Communication in a Simulated Clinical Case

Lead Author: Kelly V. Johnson, EdD, RN
Submitted by: Marsha Harman, Rush University

Utilizing standardized patients (SPs) as a strategy to potentially improve beginning level nursing students’ confidence, satisfaction, and communication after simulated clinical cases is an innovative approach in nursing education. To examine how an SP encounter affects these three things, first semester undergraduate nursing students completed a simulation either an SP or high-fidelity manikin. Students who completed the simulation with an SP reported greater satisfaction and improved communication.

Read More

Standardized Patients or Conventional Lecture for Teaching Communication Skills to Undergraduate Medical Students: A Randomized Controlled Study

Lead Author: Pierre A. Geoffroy
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME Chicago

A group of researchers at Paris Diderot University conducted a randomized controlled study. They compared the effectiveness of teaching communication skills via standardized patients versus a conventional lecture format. The Standardized Patients helped the medical student perform 5 particular communication skills better than the lecture counterpart.

Read More

What It’s Like to Examine a Fake Medical Patient on Zoom

By: Rachel Withers
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The past few months have seen a great rush to get activities online, especially in the fields of education and medicine. At the intersection of these two fields lies a conundrum: How are trainee doctors supposed to practice examining patients when they can’t be in the same room as them? Since March, the Association of American Medical Colleges’ guidance has recommended medical students not be involved in any direct patient care in COVID-affected areas. But while medical students may not be essential, human interaction is essential to medical training. Enter: remote SPs.

Read More

Monitoring Communication Skills Progress of Medical Students: Establishing a Baseline Has Value, Predicting the Future is Difficult

Lead Author: Kathleen Hanley
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME

A group of medical educators look for patterns in the development of communication skills in a cohort of medical students. The reported results show an overall increase in communication skills but leave a question for further research about whether or not an Introductory Clinical Experience at the beginning of medical school is a good predictor of performance on future communication skills.

Read More

Autonomous Motivation in Medical Education

Author: Rashmi A. Kusurkar
Submitted by: Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda University

The author has provided an interesting discussion that describes autonomous motivation and its necessity in the practice of medical education. Autonomous motivation is “motivation that arises out of genuine interest or personal endorsement or valuing of an activity”. This type of personal motivation creates life-long learners, which is a vital goal in medical education.

Read More

Introduction to New Blog Series: Voices of the SPs During the Pandemic

Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME

We, as SP Administrative Directors and Educators, have been so busy.  We’re engaged in trying to keep our programs running, reshaping the educational and technical frameworks of what we do and how we do it, and navigating social injustices and political pressures throughout the pandemic.  It’s been difficult to find moments to just pause and breathe.  As our field began taking that first collective breath, I found I was missing the voice of our SPs who have been absent from our daily work.  No longer passing them in our centers and chatting with them regularly, I longed to hear from them.

Read More

Providing Remote Students with Access to a Video-Enabled Standardized Patient Simulation on Interprofessional Competencies and Late-Life Depression Screening

Lead Author: Melodee Harris, PhD, APRN, FAAN
Submitted by: Marsha Harman, Rush University

Standardized patient (SP) simulation is used to teach geropsychiatry. This project tested feasibility and effectiveness of video-enabled SP simulation to teach interprofessional (IP) late-life depression screening. The study focuses on the potential advantages of remote learning for students in rural areas, including savings on travel and faculty time. (In the light of the COVID-19 pandemic, an additional advantage is the ability to continue simulation-based learning while maintaining social distancing.)

Read More

Lessons in Finding Happiness During Hard Times

By: Sari Harrar
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UC-San Diego

Feeling good may be the last thing on your mind as the coronavirus pandemic grinds into its sixth month in America. As we struggle to revive after arguably one of the world’s worst health and economic calamities, is even talking about happiness self-absorbed and inappropriate?

Read More

‘Implementing Best Practices of Standardized Patient Methodology’ is Available for Preorder

By: Lou Clark, Gayle Gliva-McConvey and Cate Nicholas
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

SP Educators Gayle Gliva-McConvey, Cate Nicholas and Lou Clark wrote and edited Implementing Best Practices of Standardized Patient Methodology, part of Springer's Comprehensive Healthcare Simulation Series, and now available for preorder with a release date of September 23, 2020. The book was written by SP Educators for SP Educators framed with the ASPE Standards of Best Practices. Fueled by Gliva-McConey's vision and spirit of collaboration, they are joined by 30 U.S. and international chapter authors along with numerous interviews and samples throughout from experts globally in our community of practice.

Read More

Once Upon a Time…the Hero Sheltered in Place

By: Lisa Rosenbaum, M.D.
Submitted by Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

I have read so many stories of individuals responding to the call-in places hit hard by COVID. I think how brave and incredible they are for setting aside their lives and jumping into the fray. As a nurse, I often feel I am not doing “enough”. I found this article hit home and addressed some of the emotions I have been struggling with during these unprecedented times.

Read More

A Medical Student Couldn’t Find How Symptoms Look on Darker Skin. He Decided to Publish a Book About It.

By: Sydney Page
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, NBOME

“Malone Mukwende, a 20-year-old medical student, found himself repeatedly asking the same question: ‘But what will it look like on darker skin?’

Read More

Using Motivational Interviewing to Address Tobacco Cessation: Two Standardized Patient Cases for Pediatric Residents

Lead author: Rachel Boykan
Submitted by: Todd Lash, The Ohio State University

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a well-established evidence-based method of working with patients to promote health behavior change. Standardized patient (SP) simulation allows trainees to practice and receive feedback on clinical and communication skills and may be useful in applying MI techniques to address tobacco use and exposure. The authors developed two SP cases for pediatric residents to practice addressing tobacco use with parents of their patients.

Read More

In The Spotlight: Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Submitted By: Howard M. Gregory II
Full Center Name: Skills and Simulation Center – Health Education Campus
Center Location: Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Year Opened: Program 2006; Center 2019
Bragging Points:

  • Just moved into a new center!
  • 20 exam rooms

Learner Groups Supported



Read More

Sawbones: Systemic Racism in Medical Honors

By: Dr. Sydnee McElroy, Justin McElroy
Submitted by: Marsha Harman, Rush Center for Clinical Skills and Simulation, Rush University

AOA is a medical honors society that’s supposed to separate top-tier medical students from the rest of the pack. It helps determine which doctors get the top jobs in the most competitive fields. The problem? There’s implicit racism in the way it chooses members, and fixing it may be a massive challenge.

Read More

The Sorting Hat of Medicine: Why Hufflepuffs Wear Stethoscopes and Slytherins Carry Scalpels

Lead Author: Maria Baimas-George, MD, MPH
Submitted by Kathy Herzberger, Loma Linda School of Medicine

As a fan of Harry Potter, when I saw the title of this article, I just had to read it. If you are familiar with Harry, then you will enjoy this. The authors hypothesize that with each medical specialty often attracting particular personalities, the percentage of residents who self-sorted into the different Hogwarts' houses would vary depending on their chosen specialty.

Read More

A Randomized Controlled Trial of Suicide Prevention Training for Primary Care Providers: A Study Protocol

Lead author: Wendi F. Cross
Submitted by: Todd Lash, The Ohio State University

Background: Suicide is a national public health crisis and a critical patient safety issue. It is the 10th leading cause of death overall and the second leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults (15–34 years old). Research shows 80% of youth who died by suicide saw their primary care provider within the year of their death. It is imperative that primary care providers develop the knowledge and skills to talk with patients about distress and suicidal thoughts, and to assess and respond in the context of the ongoing patient - primary care provider relationship.

Read More