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ASPE Conference 2018 By the Numbers

ASPE Conference 2018 By the Numbers
By: Todd Lash, Publications Committee Chair

The annual ASPE Conference, “Power of the Past, Force of the Future,” will be held in Kansas City, MO, from Saturday, June 16 – Wednesday, June 20. Each year we like to summarize some numbers to demonstrate the diversity in program offerings.

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Research Article: Challenging Conversations with Simulated Patients

Research Article: Challenging Conversations with Simulated Patients
Lead Author: Diane Dennis
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

A lot of discussion has been dedicated in recent years to figuring out how the millennial mind works and what makes them excited to learn. In this article, the investigators use simulation with physiotherapy students to engage them in the learning process. Their results are very positive and show us a unique structure for incorporating simulation scenarios with a very large group of learners. Read the full article in The Clinical Teacher here.

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General Interest: The Exam Room Secrecy that Puts Women at Risk

General Interest: The Exam Room Secrecy that Puts Women at Risk
By: Wendy Kline
Submitted by: Katherine Rivlin, MD, The Ohio State University

While this article was published to report about a scandal at the University of Southern California, it contains a nice history of teaching the pelvic exam. A lot of progress has been made in thoughtfully and sensitively teaching this exam, but this article also highlights the need for ongoing diligence and persistence in keeping the momentum going, especially in our current political/cultural environment. A public awareness like this makes the great work our GTAs are doing all the more important! Read the full article in the Washington Post here.

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Research Article: Experiential Learning: Critical Analysis of Standardized Patient and Disability Simulation

Research Article: Experiential Learning: Critical Analysis of Standardized Patient and Disability Simulation
Lead Author: Laura VanPuymbrouck
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

This paper champions the use of patients with disabilities as SP Educators, or SPWDs in OT education. Traditionally, SPs without disabilities would be used in Disability Simulation, which proved problematic in many ways. The authors offer recommendations such as developing long-term partnerships with disability organizations and involving people with disabilities in the development, implementation, and evaluation of experiential learning opportunities. Together, these recommendations can help ensure that students have access to evidence-based educational approaches and best practices that accurately reflect the self-identified needs, concerns, and priorities of intersectional disability communities. Read the full article in the Journal of Occupational Therapy Education here.

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Research Article: Increasing Confidence and Changing Behaviors in Primary Care Providers Engaged in Genetic Counseling

Research Article: Increasing Confidence and Changing Behaviors in Primary Care Providers Engaged in Genetic Counseling
Lead author: Michael S. Wilkes
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Screening and counseling for genetic conditions is an increasingly important part of primary care practice, particularly given the paucity of genetic counselors in the United States. However, primary care physicians (PCPs) often have an inadequate understanding of evidence-based screening; communication approaches that encourage shared decision-making; ethical, legal, and social implication (ELSI) issues related to screening for genetic mutations; and the basics of clinical genetics. This study explored whether an interactive, web-based genetics curriculum followed by sessions with Standardized Patients helped make positive change in PCP knowledge and behaviors. Read the full article in BioMed Central Medical Education here.

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General Interest: Losing the ‘Therapeutic Gaze’

General Interest: Losing the ‘Therapeutic Gaze’
By: Howard Wolinsky
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

A patient with several chronic diseases describes his feelings as he encounters physicians who seem increasingly focused on computer screens instead of the patient. His craving for eye contact is palpable, and it drove him to seek out a health technology expert, Enid Montague of DePaul University, who confirms the importance of “the therapeutic gaze” and how effective interfaces allow for minimal eye-to-screen time. As for our profession, this article illuminates the importance of giving feedback on learners’ eye contact while they’re still in the habit-forming stage. Read the full article in at MedPage Today here.

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Media Article: Brush With Death Leads Doctor To Focus On Patient Perspective

Media Article: Brush With Death Leads Doctor To Focus On Patient Perspective
By: Michelle Andrews
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

This article tells the story of Dr. Rana Awdish of the Henry Ford Health System, whose near-fatal rupture in her liver gave her perspective as a patient that inspired a passion for improving empathy in patient communication. She recalls the words of the medical team and the negative emotional impact they had on her and her will to survive. She has since developed CLEAR Conversations, a program which uses SPs to improve conversations between Henry Ford providers and patients. Read the full article at NPR here.

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Research Article: A Novel Approach to Simulation-Based Education for Veterinary Medical Communication Training Over Eight Consecutive Pre-Clinical Quarters

Research Article: A Novel Approach to Simulation-Based Education for Veterinary Medical Communication Training Over Eight Consecutive Pre-Clinical Quarters
By: Ryane E. Englar
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Experiential learning through the use of SPs is the primary way by which human medical schools teach clinical communication. The profession of veterinary medicine has followed suit in response to new graduates' and their employers' concerns that veterinary interpersonal skills are weak and unsatisfactory. As a result, standardized clients (SCs) are increasingly relied upon as invaluable teaching tools within veterinary curricula to advance relationship-centered care in the context of a clinical scenario. However, there is little to no uniformity in the approach that various colleges of veterinary medicine take when designing simulation-based education (SBE). Midwestern University College of Veterinary Medicine (MWU CVM) details its approach to building its SBE in the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education here.

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General Interest: Discover First-Year Medical Student Priorities

General Interest: Discover First-Year Medical Student Priorities
By: Cassie Kosarek
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

A first-year student details her experience transitioning from premedical studenthood to her first year of medical school. She finds she’s had to make adjustments to her study habits, narrow her extracurricular interests, and find time to connect with herself and nature. This could be useful to any of us who find ourselves interacting with a stressed-out student who’s having trouble adjusting. Read the full article at U.S. News & World Report here.

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General Interest: What it’s Like Being Transgender in the Emergency Room

General Interest: What it’s Like Being Transgender in the Emergency Room
By: Susmita Baral
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

In this National Geographic article, author Susmita Baral points out the various ways that hospitals and medical programs around the country are approaching educating current and future health professionals about transgender care. As surveys and polls have shown, inequality and mistreatment in healthcare has been a major concern for those in the transgender community. There are many in health education who are trying to change this. Baral details some of what is being done in health education. The author mentions 54 year-old- transgender advocate Kate Terrell who says “The bare minimum is for providers to be normal around their transgender patients. The most important thing doctors can learn or remind themselves,” she says, “is to treat humans like human beings.” Read the full article in National Geographic here.

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Research Article: What can we learn from simulation-based training to improve skills for end-of-life care? Insights from a national project in Israel

Research Article: What can we learn from simulation-based training to improve skills for end-of-life care? Insights from a national project in Israel
Lead author: Mayer Brezis
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

This research article describes the design of interprofessional simulation-based workshops with standardized patients and family members to improve end of life (EOL) care. These simulations provided an opportunity to explore barriers and challenges for hospital staff in providing optimal care at the EOL. The workshops so were successful in highlighting the need for more training that they eventually led to an expansion of palliative care services and demand for EOL care education in nursing homes and other professional areas. Read the full article in the Israel Journal of Health Policy Research here.

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Media Article: VTC School of Medicine Student Motivated to Serve Patients and Overcome Health Disparities

Media Article: VTC School of Medicine Student Motivated to Serve Patients and Overcome Health Disparities
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

This article is a wonderful display of hope in the future of medicine. Learn about Jay Patel and his path to medicine which the article points out “begins with the heart.” Patel gives praise for what we do as SP Educators. As the author writes, “His favorite part of the school so far has been the clinical skills curriculum. We are exposed to patients from day one and have interactions with standardized patients [or trained patient actors] every week.  It prepares us to interact with patients and be a physician who actually listens to your patients, knows how to talk to them and interview them, and tie that into the clinical reasoning aspect of medicine." Read the full article at WVNSTC.com here.

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SIGs: Introducing the Social Justice Special Interest Group

SIGs: Introducing the Social Justice Special Interest Group
By: Kevin Hobbs

The Social Justice Special Interest Group (SIG) has assembled a description of the SIG. The SIG was established in 2017 and currently has 6 active members and 12 associate members.

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General Interest: Top 5 Lists for Kansas City

General Interest: Top 5 Lists for Kansas City
Submitted by: Julie Mack, KU School of Medicine

Julie Mack has shared some “Top 5” lists of destinations and restaurants in Kansas City.

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Editorial: Certifcation, accreditation and professional standards: striving to define competency, a response to ASPiH Standards for Simulation-Based Education: Process of Consultation, Design and Implementation

Editorial: Certification, accreditation and professional standards: striving to define competency, a response to ASPiH Standards for Simulation-Based Education: Process of Consultation, Design and Implementation
By: Carrie Bohnert and Karen Lewis
Submitted by: Valerie Fulmer, ASPE President

The Standards of Best Practice Committee members Barrie Bohnert and Karen Lewis discuss the Simulation- Based Education in Healthcare Standards Framework and Guidance published by the Association for Simulated Practice in Healthcare (ASPiH) in 2017. Read the editorial in the BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning here.

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General Interest: My Stepfather Started Raping Me When I Was 7. It Changed The Course Of My Life Forever.

General Interest: My Stepfather Started Raping Me When I Was 7. It Changed The Course Of My Life Forever.
By: Michael Broussard
Submitted by: Denise LaMarra, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Michael Broussard is one of the SPs at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. When he is not working as an SP, he does a one-man show, “Ask a Sex Abuse Survivor.” It is a very powerful performance, which he does in theaters throughout the region, and now nationally. He has also performed at the medical school at the University of Pennsylvania for the past two years. Both the play and the article are strong testimonials on theater art as a healing mechanism. Read the full article at HuffingtonPost.com here.

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General Interest: 3 Methods for Teaching Communication to Radiology Residents

General Interest: 3 Methods for Teaching Communication to Radiology Residents
By: Subrata Thakar
Submitted by: Michael Maury, UCSD School of Medicine

In this short article, Subrata Thakar mentions 3 methods for teaching communication; (1) Microteaching (2) Simulation-based Training and (3) Mnemonics, Scripts and General Aids. For more details and perhaps new insight into these various communication methods read the full article at Radiology Business here.

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Media Article: Oregon medical students face tough test - Talking about dying

Media Article: Oregon medical students face tough test - Talking about dying
By: Jonel Aleccia
Submitted by: Kerensa Peterson, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

The distraught wife paced the exam room, anxious for someone to come and tell her about her husband. She’d brought him to the emergency department that afternoon when he complained about chest discomfort. Sophia Hayes, 27, a fourth-year medical student at the Oregon Health & Science University, entered with a quiet knock, took a seat and asked the wife to sit, too. Softly and slowly, Hayes explained the unthinkable: The woman’s husband had had a heart attack. His heart stopped. The intensive care team spent 45 minutes trying to save him. Then Hayes delivered the news dreaded by doctors and family members alike. “I’m so, so sorry,” she said. “But he died.” Read the full article at Salon.com here.

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General Interest: Type A and Type B Personalities - Useful Measure of Personality or Conspiracy Funded by Tobacco Companies?

General Interest: Type A and Type B Personalities - Useful Measure of Personality or Conspiracy Funded by Tobacco Companies?
By: Adam Sinicki
Submitted by: Dan Brown, Emory School of Medicine

Continuing our exploration of medical and/or psychological terms that are frequently misused or misapplied, this article discusses the history of Type A and Type B personality theory. People often refer to themselves or others as “Type A” personalities, but “Type B” is much rarer in conversation. Sinicki, a writer who holds a bachelor’s psychology degree, breaks down the theory and explores its roots as an attempt to identify people who live at a higher stress level, and who are therefore more likely to suffer cardiac disease. The founders of the theory, Drs. Meyer Friedman and Ray Rosenman, were cardiologists not psychologists, and their study has been criticized for decades, partially due to its connection to the tobacco industry.

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Research Article: A Walk in My Shoes - Using Art to Explore the Lived Experience of Psychiatric–Mental Health Standardized Patients

Research Article: A Walk in My Shoes - Using Art to Explore the Lived Experience of Psychiatric–Mental Health Standardized Patients
Lead author: Debra Webster
Submitted by: Janice Radway, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Use of SPs to teach mental health nursing skills is increasing. Although the literature regarding the effectiveness of this teaching strategy supports its use, information regarding the effect of portraying mental illness on SPs is lacking. Using a qualitative approach incorporating art as expression, this effect was examined. Five SPs created an artistic expression to describe their work portraying an individual with mental illness while working with senior nursing students enrolled in a psychiatric–mental health clinical nursing course. Themes identified include: (a) Walking the Walk, (b) Listen to Me, (c) See Me as a Person, and (d) Letting it Get to Me. The current article offers best practice approaches to address psychological implications for SPs portraying mental illness. Read the full article in the Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services here.

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